Treatment

Posted Wed 6 Feb 2019 5.27pm by Acraigh

I am 30 years old and I have recently been diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. It came as a shock because iv always been quite healthy and active in the past.

I have seen my rheumatologist only once and she advised to start methotrexate but advised I can’t really drink and the side effects looks quite scary!

It sounds selfish but I do like to have a drink with friends, I am a very sociable person and the thought of not being able to is getting me down. Is there any alternative treatments available which I could still drink? I am only 30 after all πŸ˜ƒ

Posted Thu 7 Feb 2019 10.51am by jenny

Hi Acraigh,

I am newly diagnosed in the last couple of months. I am 32 and was also offered methotrexate. But on talking with the nurse i now take Sulfasalazine as I want children very soon and found that this was the best option for me at the moment in time.

i hope this helps!

Posted Thu 7 Feb 2019 11.09am by Alexd

Hi Acraigh, I also have P.A and on Methotrexate and Golimumab monthly injections. I loved socialising and have a few Guinness or Rums but made a decision to stop drinking to see if I could get on top of my pain. After 5yrs - I still go out and have a laugh. I tend to drink 0% bottles now or the usual cokes ect. Not Drinking alcohol doesn't mean your life is over. My blood tests are occasionally elavated as the meds can cause problems with your liver which is another reason I stopped - i hope you find a treatment to help you.

Posted Mon 25 Mar 2019 9.47am by Kim

Hi Acraigh.. sorry Im a little late to the thread. Im 29 years old and was diagnosed with PA last October. They tried to give me Methotrexate too.. but as I want to have kids in the not too distant future I am on Sulfasalazine instead... but it isnt working. There isnt much else they can try me on in terms of DMARDS so they are moving me onto Biologics. Its a minefield! And I dont really understand it and it is all definitely scary! I do know that I have still been going out and having a good time and drinking ( just not as much as I used to) unfortunately though I have found that alcohol aggravates my PA.. so I tend to limit how many times I go out.. it hurts enough without the help! Hope you find a treatment that suits you πŸ™‚

Posted Mon 25 Mar 2019 12.18pm by EQ

Again, may be a little late with a response for you Acraigh. I'm currently 23 years of age and was advised to go on to Methotrexate when I had turned 20 years old, at this point I was so down with everything that was going on that I looked at what was causing me a problem in my life and decided to stop drinking.

I had to be taken of Methotrexate only 1 year later due to the meds elevating my liver function over 3x the normal limit!! Since then I have been on a biologic drug called Humira and it has worked wonders but even though I can drink again, I still haven't touched an alcoholic drink since I was pretty much 19 years old.

It all depends on what is going to be the best for you regarding your health and your life, are you able to live it to the full potential at the moment and would the meds help more so to you? Obviously you can still go out and socialise but my train of thoughts were always that I didn't need to drink to have a good time and to me the meds were more important for my life.

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